New Link Found Between Liquid Crystals and Superconductors: Crop Circle Connection?

I’ve always suspected a link between crop circle anomalies and room-temperature superconductivity. And I’ve argued many times that crop circles may behave like liquid crystals, such as those in your mobile phone or computer flat screen display. New research brings these theoretical connections a bit closer. An article in New Scientist, (January 16, 2010–“Liquid crystal link to superconductor mystery), explains how “electronic liquid crystals” may, in fact, be behind the mystery of high-temperature superconductivity: a heretofore unexplained phenomenon where electrons pair up and electrical resistance in a room-temperature material drops to near zero. In other words, the material spontaneously conducts electricity much more efficiently, a process that usually only happens at extreme cold temperatures.
Researchers used a special type of tunneling microscope to actually see the electrons in an iron-based superconductor. When they did, the researchers observed electrons as “faint striped patterns created by quantum effects” that cause the electrons to line up in a particular direction. To me this seems very analogous to the swirled, directional patterns of wheat or other grain materials in a crop formation that makes them look just like layered liquid crystals. Could they actually be liquid crystals?
The Nobel laureate Brian Josephson, one of the pioneers in superconductivity, suggested controversially that it may be related to remote viewing and other related phenomena. To me, this recent research, brings us one step closer to understanding how the directional, swirled patterns of crop circle lay is related to the weird battery draining and camera destroying effects that are consistently reported from time to time by visitors, including the author, to crop circles.

This entry was posted in crop circles, new energy technologies and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.