The New Yorker article on Quantum Entanglement

"Black Hole" by Alex Borland

“Black Hole” by Alex Borland

Lawrence M. Krauss makes some serious errors in the following statement, ignoring both the works of Dean Raden and Princeton’s PEAR Labs, which have shown that human thoughts affect, at a very subtle but statistically significant level, the outcome of quantum experiments: “The truth, however, is that consciousness is irrelevant to the act of measurement, which can be done by machines, or even by single photons. If consciousness matters, then the inner thoughts of the experimenter who operates the machines would also have to be reported when we write up the results of our experiments. We’d need to know whether they were daydreaming about sex, for example. We don’t. The machines can record data and print it out whether or not a person is in the room, and those printouts, which behave classically, don’t change when the humans come back.” Read the full New Yorker article, “Tangled Up in Entanglement.

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