Crystalline Structure Increases Casimir Effect

casimir effectA European team has found a way to use crystalline structures to increase the Casimir Effect: the nanoscale force that attracts particles at a quantum scale. The Casimir effect is usually measured with microscale, flat metallic plates and measures in at a tiny 100 piconewtons. However, when the team measured the same forces using the crystalline layer of metals called AIST and used to coat to rewritable CDs and DVDs, the force measured 20 to 25 per cent higher. This is highly significant in that the result suggests shapes affect quantum effects. Perhaps this is true at other scales too such as in crop circles where unexplained energy effects such as a repeated cases of sudden battery failure and other phenomenon have been reported.

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